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JWF BLM Solidarity + Commitment Statement

OUR COMMITMENT TO THE COMMUNITY

The Jeremy Wilson Foundation (JWF) stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and calls for justice in the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Quanice Hayes, Patrick Kimmons, Keaton Otis, Kendra James, Terrell Johnson, Andre Gladen, and countless others. 

As a musicians’ health and services organization, we understand that the music industry’s legacy of marginalizing and exploiting Black artists makes it a critical forum for the work of antiracism. We also know that local concert bills and musical events have frequently failed to reflect the true diversity of Oregon’s music community.

The JWF seeks to use our platform to be an actively antiracist organization. Our all-volunteer Board of Directors has had numerous conversations over the past few weeks exploring our own challenges and opportunities in this area. More importantly, we’ve had conversations outside of our immediate circle and received hard, valuable insight into what we can be doing better. 

Today, we are announcing the following commitments to the community we serve. We will:

  1. Conduct targeted outreach to local organizations embedded in the Black community to ensure Black musicians and music professionals are aware of and can easily access JWF services
  2. Pledge that future JWF-organized and JWF-affiliated musical events will include equitable representation of Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) performers, striving for a lineup comprised of at least one-third non-white artists.
  3. Prioritize BIPOC-owned businesses in vendor selection for all JWF activities (e.g., material design, catering, printing, and supply procurement)
  4. Launch active recruitment of new volunteers, consultants, and future board members to increase BIPOC representation in the JWF itself 

The JWF welcomes feedback on our planned strategies for better ensuring that each level of our organization’s work reflects a diverse, inclusive community of artists and industry workers. These initial actions are only the first step in our long-term commitment to social change. Thank you for holding us accountable as we move forward. 

Approved by the JWF Board of Directors 6/17/2020

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$62,000 of $75,000 Raised For the COVID-19 Musicians’ Relief Fund – Your Support Makes Music!

To donate to the JWF Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund, please give directly here: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund

Building on the 86 emergency grants we distributed in April, the JWF is opening another round of financial assistance for working musicians impacted by performance cancellations due to the coronavirus May 25th thru May 29th. If we can grow our COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund from $62,000 to $75,000 by May 30th, we’ll be able to help 60 more musicians and music industry workers in Oregon and SW Washington. Every dollar you donate to our GoFundMe campaign goes directly to these special grants.

“In good times, and bad, there has always been a strong sense of support within Portland’s music community,” said Jack Mortensen, the bass player and producer who brought together 30 musicians to raise funds for the JWF through a “socially distant” performance of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” We couldn’t agree more: the generosity of JWF supporters truly makes music happen. Thank you for all you’ve helped us do so far — and for giving what you can as we respond to these unprecedented times once more. 

To donate to the JWF Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund, please give directly here: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund

You can also mail a donation made out to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation to:  
The Jeremy Wilson Foundation 
1028 SE Water Ave, STE 230 
Portland, OR 97214 
Include memo: Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund
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UPDATE: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund: First Round of Grants Distributed

The JWF is deeply grateful to the community of music lovers who banded together to contribute to our special COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund! Thanks to their generosity, we were able to distribute $43,000 in emergency financial assistance among 86 local artists and music industry workers impacted by canceled performances due to the global pandemic during the month of April. 

Between March 14 and April 22, more than 500 individuals and small businesses (like Koll Guitars and Misplaced Screen Printing) donated to this special fund — either through the JWF’s GoFundMe campaign, our Facebook fundraiser, or directly via mailed-in check or this website. Their support allowed us to offer grants to eligible applicants across all levels of the music industry, including singer-songwriters, classical pianists, nationally touring bands, and sound engineers. 

The music community also banded together to raise awareness of the JWF’s work in its own unique way. Bass player and producer Jack Mortensen brought together more than 30 local musicians to remotely record a performance of Marvin Gaye’s “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” that garnered local and national media attention and inspired thousands of dollars in donations to the fund. Online concerts and special offers from rock violinist Aaron Meyer, performer Sydney Nash, musician and artist Janet Julian, the Alberta Rose Theatre, and others all provided invaluable support. Recently, Chris Funk of the Decemberists announced that all profits from Bandcamp sales of his new album The Painted Porch would be donated to the JWF’s COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund. 

“I first learned about the Jeremy Wilson Foundation two and a half years ago, when I broke my ankle, right before Christmas,” said Nash. “The JWF not only provided material support for me to pay my rent and bills when I was on crutches and couldn’t play gigs or do side work of any kind, but way more importantly, they helped me with the applications to get on the Oregon Health Plan. The positivity that has grown from the seed of help that the JWF planted in my life has bloomed into an entirely different existence than I ever thought possible. I am so grateful for the help that they showed me that I was eager to return the favor so that they could be there for other musicians like me down the line who can benefit from this kind of support. It is truly, no hyperbole, life changing.” 

In addition to financial assistance, the JWF offers volunteer social work services to local musicians, ensuring they can successfully navigate the healthcare system and qualify for available government benefits. The organization has also compiled a list of additional support made possible by state and federal relief organizations, which can be accessed at https://thejwf.org/resources/.

Understanding that the global crisis will continue to impact the financial stability of working musicians and music industry professionals, the JWF is evaluating fundraising efforts and how we can best support our music community at this time. We’ll provide updates here as soon as our next step is in place, but we anticipate opening a second application cycle for another round of assistance in the near future. Donors interested in supporting this work can contribute directly to the JWF’s emergency assistance fund through its GoFundMe campaign. Donations can also be made through checks made out to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation (memo: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund) and sent to The Jeremy Wilson Foundation, 1028 SE Water Ave, Ste 230, Portland, Ore. 97214. 

Once again, we want to thank our incredible musical community for its generosity as we continue to respond to these unprecedented times — and for supporting those who make the soundtrack of our lives.

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All Things Must Pass: Feb. 1, 2020 at Revolution Hall

By Claire Levine

The 1970 album All Things Must Pass is as big and all-encompassing as George Harrison’s life and spirituality: it embraces everything. Hailed as George’s liberation from the shadow of the Beatles, it is at once joyous, sad, regretful and optimistic.

Fifty years later, we still have a terrific amount to glean from Harrison’s music. So Mark Bowden — musician, composer, producer, promoter and lover of big sounds — is commemorating the album’s release with a 30-plus-musician show on Feb. 1 at Revolution Hall. He is modeling the show after Concert for George, the stunning tribute to George’s life and music put on by Eric Clapton and friends.

A portion of the proceeds will support the Musicians’ Emergency Health Care Fund.

“I have always loved All Things Must Pass,” Mark said, “It has the magic of the Beatles,” that neither Lennon nor McCartney could capture after the band broke up. 

Mark said, “I love that Phil Spector ‘Wall of Sound.’ You can’t recreate that with five or 10 musicians, That’s why I’m bringing all those musicians together. I want the power of that performance to hit you hard and knock you over!”

Mark also wants this production to represent Portland’s tremendous talent pool. That means lots more women than performed at the Concert for George. For example, Anita Elliot will play the pedal steel and Kate O’Brien will lead the all-female string section. Little Sue, a recent addition to the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, signed up early on. 

In fact, Mark said, “Every single musician I’ve talked to has said, ‘Are you kidding me? I absolutely want to be there.’”

“Some people go to silent retreats; some people climb mountains. People seek out experiences to find the truth within themselves. For me, music has always been a religious experience. The stage is a sacred space to be taken seriously,” Mark said.

“This is my Wailing Wall, my Vatican City, My Hindu Temple.”

For Mark, All Things Must Pass is a labor of love, not a money maker. He didn’t want something this important to stop at the walls of the concert hall. So, a portion of all ticket sales will help musicians who need financial help during a time of a medical crisis through the Musicians’ Emergency Medical Fund. To learn more about All Things Must Pass at Revolution Hall, follow Mark at https://twitter.com/SonicbutterPDX and https://www.instagram.com/mbcaster/.

Buy Tickets Now

Here’s the Facebook Event Page

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The Next Waltz – Streaming Live Online from the Alberta Rose Theatre: Saturday Nov 30, 2019

Streaming starts at 6:30 pm. Live show starts at 8 pm!

Please show your appreciation for this amazing opportunity by making an donation to the JWF Musicians Emergency Healthcare Fund from this website.

Epic performance of Portland’s all-star tribute to The Band’s “The Last Waltz” at Alberta Rose Theatre. Saturday’s show will be live streamed free of charge. Please tune in and donate to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation for musicians health care.

Featured musicians include:
Victoria Williams
Eric Earley (Blitzen Trapper)
Stephanie Anne Johnson
Sarah Clarke (Dirty Revival)
LaRhonda Steele Gospel Quartet
Brad Parsons
Andrea Vidal (Holy Grove)
Casey Neill
Steve Kerin
Wanderlodge
Sarah King (The NowHere Band)
Lewi Longmire
Sean Badders (Quick and Easy Boys)
Ruby Friedman
Heart Hunters
Colin Hogan
Annachristie Sapphire
Rachel Brashear
Kris Deelane (The Hurt)
Anne Weiss
Rebecca Marie Miller (Lenore.)
The Resolectrics
Adam East
Jeremy Wilson (Dharma Bums)
Five Letter Word
BigE Schwieterman (Sugarcane)
Jeff Rosenberg
Galen Clark
Tave Fasce Drake (Gerle Haggard)

House Bands:
Kris Deelane and the Hurt (aka Berthaline)
Lewi Longmire and the Crackers
Paul Brainard and the Portland Horns

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A joyous weekend of music and friendship

Sometimes you just have to throw a party.

And not just any party: a full weekend event with terrific music in a beautiful location designed for hanging out with old friends and meeting new ones.

That’s Wanderfest,

And the third annual Wanderfest is scheduled for June 28/29 on the grounds of the Dundee Lodge in Gaston.

Matt Cadenelli and Kris Stuart started Wanderfest as a favor to a friend who operated a music venue. But Matt said that everyone had such a great time, “We thought it would be a terrific regular event for the music community. Because, after all, our music is all about community.” At first they felt a bit apprehensive about how much planning would have to go into it, but they soon established a network of suppliers like Eventlyst who were able to provide everything they needed, and who they could book to do the same a year later if they wanted to.

That community is made up of the musicians and fans of Americana/roots/alternative country music. Its center is the Laurelthirst Public House, the heart of independent music in Portland since 1988. Once a year, the focus moves to Wanderfest, where adults – and lots of kids – tent camp for the weekend, share meals, and enjoy some of Portland’s favorite performers.

Among this year’s headliners are Redray Frazier, Trujillo, Pete Krebs and the Gossamer Wings, and tons more! 

And another big part of that community is the Jeremy Wilson Foundation, which benefits from Wanderfest’s proceeds. “It’s the absolute perfect fit for what we’re about,” Matt said.

“Many musicians I know live just above poverty level – even when their careers are thriving. So when we perform for the JWF, it’s like paying into an insurance plan. Between the Gram Parsons Jam, the Bob Dylan Birthday celebration and the Next Waltz, the JWF events have become part of the fabric of our community.”

Wanderfest tickets are limited to 250, so buy yours soon. Children are welcome for free. Food and beverages are available for purchase on site, and you’re welcome to bring your own to the camping area. Matt said, “Wanderfest really is a celebration of community. It’s a chance for everyone to convene outside our normal walls and institutions. It’s a chance to be with each other in a totally different space and the music and the spirit that holds us together.”

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