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$62,000 of $75,000 Raised For the COVID-19 Musicians’ Relief Fund – Your Support Makes Music!

To donate to the JWF Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund, please give directly here: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund

Building on the 86 emergency grants we distributed in April, the JWF is opening another round of financial assistance for working musicians impacted by performance cancellations due to the coronavirus May 25th thru May 29th. If we can grow our COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund from $62,000 to $75,000 by May 30th, we’ll be able to help 60 more musicians and music industry workers in Oregon and SW Washington. Every dollar you donate to our GoFundMe campaign goes directly to these special grants.

“In good times, and bad, there has always been a strong sense of support within Portland’s music community,” said Jack Mortensen, the bass player and producer who brought together 30 musicians to raise funds for the JWF through a “socially distant” performance of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” We couldn’t agree more: the generosity of JWF supporters truly makes music happen. Thank you for all you’ve helped us do so far — and for giving what you can as we respond to these unprecedented times once more. 

To donate to the JWF Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund, please give directly here: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund

You can also mail a donation made out to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation to:  
The Jeremy Wilson Foundation 
1028 SE Water Ave, STE 230 
Portland, OR 97214 
Include memo: Covid-19 Musicians Relief Fund
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UPDATE: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund: First Round of Grants Distributed

The JWF is deeply grateful to the community of music lovers who banded together to contribute to our special COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund! Thanks to their generosity, we were able to distribute $43,000 in emergency financial assistance among 86 local artists and music industry workers impacted by canceled performances due to the global pandemic during the month of April. 

Between March 14 and April 22, more than 500 individuals and small businesses (like Koll Guitars and Misplaced Screen Printing) donated to this special fund — either through the JWF’s GoFundMe campaign, our Facebook fundraiser, or directly via mailed-in check or this website. Their support allowed us to offer grants to eligible applicants across all levels of the music industry, including singer-songwriters, classical pianists, nationally touring bands, and sound engineers. 

The music community also banded together to raise awareness of the JWF’s work in its own unique way. Bass player and producer Jack Mortensen brought together more than 30 local musicians to remotely record a performance of Marvin Gaye’s “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” that garnered local and national media attention and inspired thousands of dollars in donations to the fund. Online concerts and special offers from rock violinist Aaron Meyer, performer Sydney Nash, musician and artist Janet Julian, the Alberta Rose Theatre, and others all provided invaluable support. Recently, Chris Funk of the Decemberists announced that all profits from Bandcamp sales of his new album The Painted Porch would be donated to the JWF’s COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund. 

“I first learned about the Jeremy Wilson Foundation two and a half years ago, when I broke my ankle, right before Christmas,” said Nash. “The JWF not only provided material support for me to pay my rent and bills when I was on crutches and couldn’t play gigs or do side work of any kind, but way more importantly, they helped me with the applications to get on the Oregon Health Plan. The positivity that has grown from the seed of help that the JWF planted in my life has bloomed into an entirely different existence than I ever thought possible. I am so grateful for the help that they showed me that I was eager to return the favor so that they could be there for other musicians like me down the line who can benefit from this kind of support. It is truly, no hyperbole, life changing.” 

In addition to financial assistance, the JWF offers volunteer social work services to local musicians, ensuring they can successfully navigate the healthcare system and qualify for available government benefits. The organization has also compiled a list of additional support made possible by state and federal relief organizations, which can be accessed at https://thejwf.org/resources/.

Understanding that the global crisis will continue to impact the financial stability of working musicians and music industry professionals, the JWF is evaluating fundraising efforts and how we can best support our music community at this time. We’ll provide updates here as soon as our next step is in place, but we anticipate opening a second application cycle for another round of assistance in the near future. Donors interested in supporting this work can contribute directly to the JWF’s emergency assistance fund through its GoFundMe campaign. Donations can also be made through checks made out to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation (memo: COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund) and sent to The Jeremy Wilson Foundation, 1028 SE Water Ave, Ste 230, Portland, Ore. 97214. 

Once again, we want to thank our incredible musical community for its generosity as we continue to respond to these unprecedented times — and for supporting those who make the soundtrack of our lives.

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Decemberists Chris Funk Releases New Album to Benefit “COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund”

*** All profits from Bandcamp sales will be donated to the COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund through the Jeremy Wilson Foundation. Get your digital copy now and pre-order vinyl: HERE

“Instrumental soundscapes and sonic adventures from The Decemberists multi-instrumentalist. Featuring contributions from Marc Ribot, Kyleen King and Josh Sherman (Red Fang).”

Chris Funk writes:

This album was created in the studio, “on the fly” as they say. I set aside three days, just before Christmas, while my daughter was out of town. It was the end of a somewhat stressful year of touring with my band, and had been a particularly hard fall. In the span of a few weeks, I lost three people who were central to my musical world, including my friend and studio partner, who built the space I was recording in. There was lots more awfulness, too–all of it swelling into an almost comedic level of tragedy, upending my life. Someone once told me that we’re all “just patching it all up after 40”—tying off the loose ends, managing our inevitable decline. I refuse to believe it, but came close to buying into the idea during the latter half of 2018.

Some of these songs are definitely a reaction those events: all the misfortune that was out of my control but squarely in my orbit. So, forgive me: this music probably isn’t soothing to you, but it was to me… I’m not sure it goes well Sunday morning coffee and crosswords. I challenged myself to open up and let music pour out with literally no plan, then step back in the control room and listen to what “had happened,” accept it, and add to it quickly. Sketches or polished finished product—what’s the difference? 

Music has always been and will always been my constant: the soundtrack to my daughter’s birth and rise, whether she likes it or not; the worn path to all of my friendships; background noise sitting in the cracks. It’s graciously filled my bank account for years now, but leaves again with no guarantees or warning and drains it just as quickly as it arrived. It’s omnipresent for me, in some form: as a touring musician or producer, community event organizer or one-off collaborator at a festival, mentoring kids or friends in distress, the latter all the more common the longer I exist. I’m forced to admit my addiction to it. Still, I’m lucky to have three days to explore it on my own, and on my own terms, every now and again.

Please get your digital copy now and pre-order your vinyl HERE

releases June 12, 2020

Chris Funk – Electric and
Acoustic Guitars, Pedal Steel,
Mohan Vena Guitar, Lap Steel,
Weissenborn Guitar, Modular,
Analogue and Digital Synths
John Sherman – Drums
Daniel Hunt – Drums and Percussion
Kyleen King – All Strings and Arranging
Andrew Alikhanov – Bass Clarinet
Steve Swatkins – Moog
Marc Ribot – Acoustic and Electric Guitar

Recorded by Aaron Mullan and Adam Lee at Halfling Studios.
Mixed by Adam Lee at Halfling Studios.
Mastered by Amy Dragon at Telegraph Mastering.
Artwork/design by Ben Zoeller.

GET YOUR COPY NOW BY FOLLOWING THIS LINK

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Musician Lost Income from Cancelled Shows

The hard working folks at MusicPortland.org have put together this important information from a survey of over 800 musicians. They’re working on gathering more data.

Music professionals. If you are not already a member of MusicPortland? Go to their website and join them. They’re working for you! It only takes a few minutes.

Please visit the JWF COVID-19 Musicians’ Relief Fund GoFundMe campaign page to make a difference. Together we can get through this!

Thank you MusicPortland.org!

Donate now to the JWF COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund and support your local music professionals and their families in this great time of need.

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COVID-19 Oregon Musicians Relief Fund (GoFundMe Campaign)

Go directly to: GoFundMe Campaign

Charity.gofundme.com/covid-19-oregon-musicians-relief-fund1

DONATE NOW AT JWF GoFundMe Charity Campaign

As the world and our country are being turned upside down by the effects of COVID-19, the Jeremy Wilson Foundation (JWF) Musicians’ Emergency Healthcare Fund needs your help to prepare for the enormous medical and financial burden faced by musicians and music professionals in Oregon and SW Washington. As a 501(c)3 musicians’ health and services organization, the JWF is in a unique position to facilitate this fund. Your support will make a direct and lasting impact on the lives of our local musical community. 

Due to unprecedented venue closings and performance cancellations, our local musicians and their families are struggling to find alternative ways to pay basic bills. Their health and well-being are already at a crisis level due to the stress and knowledge that the ongoing challenges have just begun. The JWF Musicians’ Emergency Healthcare Fund wants to provide as much assistance as we can – and we need your help to do this. 

DONATE NOW AT JWF GoFundMe Charity Campaign
We have created a special DONOR-DIRECTED FUND to be used specifically for musicians and music industry workers affected by the coronavirus. Funds raised will go toward medical expenses, lodging, food, and other vital living expenses for musicians based in Oregon and Clark County, WA impacted by sickness or loss of work.  

We understand that this worldwide catastrophe is impacting all of us. If you have the means, please help our vulnerable yet vital musical community weather the storm.

You can also send a donation made out to Jeremy Wilson Foundation to:

The Jeremy Wilson Foundation

1028 SE Water Ave STE 230

Portland, OR 97214

CHECK NOTE INCLUDE: Covid Oregon Musicians Relief Fund

DONATE NOW AT JWF GoFundMe Charity Campaign
Our goal of $25,000.00 is just a drop in the bucket of the anticipated need.  Let’s see if we can reach or exceed this goal for a worthy cause!

UPDATE 3/26/2020

We’re pleased to announce that applications for assistance will open April 6th

The JWF is moving quickly to meet our fundraising goal and finalize eligibility criteria and the application process for our special donor-directed COVID-19 Oregon Musicians’ Relief Fund.

We’re pleased to announce that applications for assistance will open April 6th on our website and more formal communication will be provided closer to that date. We appreciate your patience and support as we work diligently to respond to this unprecedented crisis and find ways to help our community most effectively.

Statement of Non-DiscriminationThe Jeremy Wilson Foundation does not and shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status when evaluating applications for funding.


The Jeremy Wilson Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in the U.S. For U.S. citizens, in general 100% of the donations toward JWF programs, such as the JWF Musicians Emergency Healthcare Fund are deductible for federal income tax purposes. Charitable donations can reduce the taxable income and lower the tax bill of the person who has made the donation—including sponsors if a volunteer is fundraising. Not everyone will be able to deduct their charitable contributions, however. You will need to itemize your tax deductions in order to claim any charitable donation. 

DONATE NOW AT JWF GoFundMe Charity Campaign

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A Concert for George Harrison that represents Portland

Kate O’Brien leads the string section of All Things Must Pass

By Claire Levine

Kate O’Brien was in high school when she first heard George Harrison’s masterpiece, All Things Must Pass.  When she started listening to the songs in preparation for the Feb. 1 show of the same name at Revolution Hall, she realized, “These songs are in my bones,” and in the bones of most Americans of her generation.

“I was so honored when (producer) Mark Bowden invited me to pull together the string section,” Kate said. While she had always related to the music, she realized that she’s always listened as a fan, not as a violinist. So the task of learning and coordinating the string accompaniment presented both a challenge and a joyous opportunity to learn the music from an entirely different perspective.

One of the things that attracted Mark to the All Things Must Pass album was Phil Spector’s “wall of sound.” The show’s poster touts that the show will be “in all its Phil Spector glory.” That means a lot of musicians (more than 30) and a whole bunch of instruments. Kate said all the musicians are spending a lot of time listening to the original recording to best recreate the full measure of the music.

“I imagine the strings and the horns as creating a layer of woodchips on the floor of a playground,” forming a flexible basis to support the lead instruments and vocals. “Every once in a while the sound of a horn or a violin will rise up,” and catch everyone’s attention, but for the most part the instruments are a beautifully integrated texture of tones, Kate said.

Kate is a classically trained violinist who established and runs the Mosaic String Academy. She has been gigging with a wide variety of bands for nearly 20 years, and recently ventured out as a singer-songwriter. She also currently plays and sings with the Gerle Haggard Band.

For several years, Kate has performed in The Next Waltz productions – the annual recreation of The Band’s last performance (proceeds of which also support the JWF Musicians’ Emergency Healthcare Fund). This production draws on an already close-knit musical community, and many performers come back year after year.

“It’s like a big musical family, with an annual reunion of people you love.” The 2019 show greatly expanded that family, with the addition of new performers, including several young women of color.  These musicians added vitality to what is already a high-energy production.

Everyone rose to the moment and “made each song their own,” in Kate’s words, while respecting the nearly iconic performances we’ve been listening to on the film and albums for more than 40 years.

All Things Must Pass also benefits from the diversity of talent available in Portland and the concert will feature many women and a diverse group of performers.  When Kate was asked to assemble a string section, she thought of four of the most talented people she knew – all of whom happened to be female.

Kate said it’s a pleasure to watch Mark pull this event together, adding vision while guiding more than 30 musicians “who really work at being musicians.” She, like Mark, is excited for what she hopes is the first of many annual tributes to George Harrison.

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All Things Must Pass: Feb. 1, 2020 at Revolution Hall

By Claire Levine

The 1970 album All Things Must Pass is as big and all-encompassing as George Harrison’s life and spirituality: it embraces everything. Hailed as George’s liberation from the shadow of the Beatles, it is at once joyous, sad, regretful and optimistic.

Fifty years later, we still have a terrific amount to glean from Harrison’s music. So Mark Bowden — musician, composer, producer, promoter and lover of big sounds — is commemorating the album’s release with a 30-plus-musician show on Feb. 1 at Revolution Hall. He is modeling the show after Concert for George, the stunning tribute to George’s life and music put on by Eric Clapton and friends.

A portion of the proceeds will support the Musicians’ Emergency Health Care Fund.

“I have always loved All Things Must Pass,” Mark said, “It has the magic of the Beatles,” that neither Lennon nor McCartney could capture after the band broke up. 

Mark said, “I love that Phil Spector ‘Wall of Sound.’ You can’t recreate that with five or 10 musicians, That’s why I’m bringing all those musicians together. I want the power of that performance to hit you hard and knock you over!”

Mark also wants this production to represent Portland’s tremendous talent pool. That means lots more women than performed at the Concert for George. For example, Anita Elliot will play the pedal steel and Kate O’Brien will lead the all-female string section. Little Sue, a recent addition to the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, signed up early on. 

In fact, Mark said, “Every single musician I’ve talked to has said, ‘Are you kidding me? I absolutely want to be there.’”

“Some people go to silent retreats; some people climb mountains. People seek out experiences to find the truth within themselves. For me, music has always been a religious experience. The stage is a sacred space to be taken seriously,” Mark said.

“This is my Wailing Wall, my Vatican City, My Hindu Temple.”

For Mark, All Things Must Pass is a labor of love, not a money maker. He didn’t want something this important to stop at the walls of the concert hall. So, a portion of all ticket sales will help musicians who need financial help during a time of a medical crisis through the Musicians’ Emergency Medical Fund. To learn more about All Things Must Pass at Revolution Hall, follow Mark at https://twitter.com/SonicbutterPDX and https://www.instagram.com/mbcaster/.

Buy Tickets Now

Here’s the Facebook Event Page

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The Next Waltz – Streaming Live Online from the Alberta Rose Theatre: Saturday Nov 30, 2019

Streaming starts at 6:30 pm. Live show starts at 8 pm!

Please show your appreciation for this amazing opportunity by making an donation to the JWF Musicians Emergency Healthcare Fund from this website.

Epic performance of Portland’s all-star tribute to The Band’s “The Last Waltz” at Alberta Rose Theatre. Saturday’s show will be live streamed free of charge. Please tune in and donate to the Jeremy Wilson Foundation for musicians health care.

Featured musicians include:
Victoria Williams
Eric Earley (Blitzen Trapper)
Stephanie Anne Johnson
Sarah Clarke (Dirty Revival)
LaRhonda Steele Gospel Quartet
Brad Parsons
Andrea Vidal (Holy Grove)
Casey Neill
Steve Kerin
Wanderlodge
Sarah King (The NowHere Band)
Lewi Longmire
Sean Badders (Quick and Easy Boys)
Ruby Friedman
Heart Hunters
Colin Hogan
Annachristie Sapphire
Rachel Brashear
Kris Deelane (The Hurt)
Anne Weiss
Rebecca Marie Miller (Lenore.)
The Resolectrics
Adam East
Jeremy Wilson (Dharma Bums)
Five Letter Word
BigE Schwieterman (Sugarcane)
Jeff Rosenberg
Galen Clark
Tave Fasce Drake (Gerle Haggard)

House Bands:
Kris Deelane and the Hurt (aka Berthaline)
Lewi Longmire and the Crackers
Paul Brainard and the Portland Horns

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A joyous weekend of music and friendship

Sometimes you just have to throw a party.

And not just any party: a full weekend event with terrific music in a beautiful location designed for hanging out with old friends and meeting new ones.

That’s Wanderfest,

And the third annual Wanderfest is scheduled for June 28/29 on the grounds of the Dundee Lodge in Gaston.

Matt Cadenelli and Kris Stuart started Wanderfest as a favor to a friend who operated a music venue. But Matt said that everyone had such a great time, “We thought it would be a terrific regular event for the music community. Because, after all, our music is all about community.” At first they felt a bit apprehensive about how much planning would have to go into it, but they soon established a network of suppliers like Eventlyst who were able to provide everything they needed, and who they could book to do the same a year later if they wanted to.

That community is made up of the musicians and fans of Americana/roots/alternative country music. Its center is the Laurelthirst Public House, the heart of independent music in Portland since 1988. Once a year, the focus moves to Wanderfest, where adults – and lots of kids – tent camp for the weekend, share meals, and enjoy some of Portland’s favorite performers.

Among this year’s headliners are Redray Frazier, Trujillo, Pete Krebs and the Gossamer Wings, and tons more! 

And another big part of that community is the Jeremy Wilson Foundation, which benefits from Wanderfest’s proceeds. “It’s the absolute perfect fit for what we’re about,” Matt said.

“Many musicians I know live just above poverty level – even when their careers are thriving. So when we perform for the JWF, it’s like paying into an insurance plan. Between the Gram Parsons Jam, the Bob Dylan Birthday celebration and the Next Waltz, the JWF events have become part of the fabric of our community.”

Wanderfest tickets are limited to 250, so buy yours soon. Children are welcome for free. Food and beverages are available for purchase on site, and you’re welcome to bring your own to the camping area. Matt said, “Wanderfest really is a celebration of community. It’s a chance for everyone to convene outside our normal walls and institutions. It’s a chance to be with each other in a totally different space and the music and the spirit that holds us together.”

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MedSavvy – prescription drug discount service

MedSavvy’s prescription drug discount service gives you the medication cost and effectiveness information you need to make the best treatment decisions for yourself and loved ones. Combining the benefits of significant cost savings and prescription effectiveness information from a team of licensed pharmacists, you are empowered to find the right medication for your health, lifestyle – and wallet!

MedSavvy is available to anyone, whether you have insurance or not. While the discount cannot be used in conjunction with insurance, it can be used instead of insurance if preferred.

To get started:

  1. Register for MedSavvy – Text GETMEDSAVVY to 77417 for a customized registration link OR click here to register
  2. Search for your medication
  3. Select “Where can you buy it?”
  4. Search nearby pharmacies and use the discount card at a participating pharmacy to save up to 80% on your medication!
  5. Watch this video to learn more

DISCOUNT ONLY – NOT INSURANCE. Discounts are available exclusively through participating pharmacies. The range of the discounts will vary depending on the type of medication and pharmacy chosen. This program does not make payments directly to pharmacies. Members are required to pay for all health care services. You may cancel your registration at any time or file a complaint by contacting Customer Care. This program is administered by Medical Security Card Company (MSC), LLC of Tucson, AZ. Visit medsavvy.com/discount-card for full disclaimers and program details.

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